THE RAMBLINGS OF A STRUGGLING ARTIST ON LIFE WITH TWO TERRIERS, A PONY WITH ISSUES AND OTHER WILDLIFE AND BIRDS THAT CROSS OUR PATH

13 June 2013

FLOWERS IN THE GARDEN AT LAST


The garden is looking particularly good at the moment thanks, I think, to everything that should have been flowering weeks ago, doing so at the same time as those which would have been out and fresh now anyway. I try and keep the garden as native as possible, not just for ethical reasons but because, frankly, anything else struggles up here. Those who have been reading this for a while will know my main planting area is a north facing border in deep, dry shade, which is a bit of a challenge but is, after three years, flourishing after many failures. Things that do particularly well are the uncultivated Columbines (Aquilegias), Hardy Geraniums and Solomon's Seal, but I'm finding new things all the time. Here are some pictures. The Columbine above was in a new little bed I've managed to dig by the gate, which gets a little bit more of the sun in the day; an hour and a half or so!


Welsh Poppy


Yellow Archangel


A lovely deep coloured Lungwort


Heartleaf (Brunnera Macrophylla)


I found these two skeletal Hydrangea petals lying in the leaf litter


Dusky Cranesbill (Geranium Phaeum)


Bugle


Red Campion 


Wood Sorrel


White Dusky (not at all!) Cranesbill (Geranium Phaeum Album)


This Geranium is supposed to be evergreen but it doesn't look great over winter I can tell you!



More Columbines


Great Masterwort (Astrantia Major)


Solomon's Seal


Wild Garlic


Geranium Pinwheel


This Geranium grows EVERYWHERE up here but I don't know its name


Billy's Button/Water Avens


Again, I don't know the name of this Cranesbill....low growing deep cut leaves...any offers?


Forget-me-not


Guelder Rose beginning to flower in the hedge

Three of the Alder in my purple and green stripy hedge have failed AGAIN this year having been replaced by the hedging company. I've had to stuff in some willow whips to fill in the gaps so no photos of it yet; it's not going well. The best laid plans...

Trigger is currently sporting a silver Duct Tape covered hind hoof having 'stubbed his toe' according to the vet. He's made a huge hole in it and I'm having to put a hot poultice on and administer antibiotic spray, all of which is held on with the tape. This morning's gale force winds did not make it easy and the Dartmoor Madams went galloping off in fear of the bits of tape flapped around whilst I attempted to fix them around a skittish Trigger's foot. So glad no one saw my efforts!

Until next time, here's a bee on the Billy's Button, blurry from buzzing. 


30 comments:

  1. Oh Lordy on the hoof front- I bet that's fun to keep on. Lovely pics as always. The sun has just come out here!! :-)

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    1. It lasts for a few hours and then falls off somewhere. It's only a hot water poultice so it's done its job. However...the hole then fills up with dirt that has to be syringed out the next day. I'll have to start packing it with hoofy stuff soon. Thank goodness I'm well stocked in the barefoot consumables department!

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  2. Oh wow those pictures are awesome!!
    The skeletal Hydrangea petals are very interesting looking. So delicate like lace.

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    1. I'm so glad I took a picture of them as the rain has now turned them to mush!

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  3. Your garden situation sounds more or less the exact opposite of mine Em.
    To start with I suspect if is much higher (we are only 600feetasl) but also our flower garden is walled and south facing. Strangely enough it is wet in parts - under the shelter of the walls mainly - so we have a lovely patch of Solomon's Seal (one of my favourites), also plenty of columbines which hybridise and self sow so that you never know what colours will emerge. Lovely photographs as usual.

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    1. Ooooo - I dream of a sunny spot for flowers Pat. Our garden at the back is TINY and south west facing but that's where we grow the vegetables. It's also where the builders left all the rubble so we plant the vegetables in piles of compost from the heap. My Columbines have produced some fantastic subtle colours over the years we've been here too.

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  4. You certainly have a wonderful display of flowers, such lovely photos to show them off too. So nice to see the bees at work, I notice Devon is letting some of the verges grow instead of cutting them back...good idea it lets the wild flowers grow and then the bees visit. Sorry to hear that Trigger has a poorly foot, always a tricky time trying to see to feet, (even if the horse stands still) let alone if it is jumpy! I always need two pairs of arms to cope with that job!

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    1. It was better this morning as the wind has dropped a bit. Unfortunately, as I squirted a syringe full of near boiling water into the hole, it splashed out all over my trousers....nice!

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  5. Most of my garden is shaded because it is wooded, so we are growing many of the same plants. It's very true that everything is flowering together.. and it's bizarre.

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    1. Very strange....where will it end?

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  6. What lovely flowers--I love the color of the Billy's Button. When we lived in Alaska, I also found that native plants did best and stuck with those as well. I try to do that here in Virginia, but there are some things that I wish didn't grow quite as well as they do.

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    1. In my wildflower book it says of that colour: 'very difficult to describe'!

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  7. With all those beautiful flowers I can just imagine what a picture your garden must look :) A lovely selection and great to see the bees enjoying the nectar :) Hope Trigger's foot improves soon.

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    1. Our neighbours had three hives and all of them perished over winter. They're planning on re-stocking them but it's very depressing. Thank goodness there appear to some around, as you say.

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  8. Beautiful pics! Hope Trigger's hoof is better soon :)

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    1. So do I....an equine podiatrist I'm not!

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  9. Beautiful photos of some very lovely flowers. It is fascinating to watch when everything is coming out this year and to see the unusual combinations of flowers in the garden. And it's wonderful to see the bees foraging, too. Hope Trigger's foot heals soon.

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    1. They are really unusual and I should really have tried to photograph them together but they don't look so great like that!

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  10. Beautiful photos Em. I love the Geranium Pinwheel, I dont think I've ever seen it before. I really think the gardens are looking better for the late start this year. Some thngs have done particularly well for me especially the Geums.

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    1. It was a mothers' day present a couple of years ago....I think I found it on ebay of all places. It's so pretty and gets to about 2 feet high. If I can dig a bit out at the end of the season, I'll send you a bit. Remind me!

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  11. Tres Beau. Hope the spring is treating you well Em - Here comes summer! Take care. Best - Mark

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    1. I think summer has gone now Mark....it's tipping down with 50mph winds!

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  12. Your garden flowers are very beautiful.

    I have a pack of newborn disposable nappies in case of hoof abscesses or if I need to cover a hoof for some reason. It seems easier to make a waterproof hoof dressing over a nappy than without and the newborn ones are a good fit for most pony or small horse feet. I expect you knew that anyway.....! Hope Trigger`s hole soon mends. It`s amazing how quickly the new horn grows.

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    1. I hadn't thought of that. This, amazingly, is my first experience of poulticing, despite my old horse being a veterinary education in most other ways! I will definitely get some for next time although his feet are absolutely TINY so I would probably still need some tape to keep it on in the field. Despite being 13.3hh, he has the hooves of a Shetland .

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  13. Fantastic photos and you have bumblebees around thank goodness!

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  14. Not many, but at least some!

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  15. WOW!!! You have some wonderful flowers and great shots of them!

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    1. Nothing like the macro lens to make things look good!

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  16. Your photos are always a delight. I'm finding the macro settings on my new camera eithr result in a shot that pleases me greatly--or one that is a complete blur.
    My cranesbills have finally settled in and begun to spread a bit. This long coolish prelude to summer has suited the perennials.

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    1. It has, hasn't it? They've taken ages to get going but are now taller than I've ever seen them, making up for lost time.

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